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Swiss Gardens Primary School

History at Swiss Gardens

“Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift, which is why we call it the present.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

At Swiss Gardens, our history curriculum ignites children’s curiosity about the past in Britain and the wider world. 

We place a high value on the importance of history and personal journey and where possible we use experts from the community to ensure our history learning is engaging, relevant and in context. We also use visits and artefacts to provide children with first hand and memorable experiences. Wherever possible we make links with our locality, the history of our local area, Shoreham by sea and  Sussex and this helps set their leanring about the past in context.

We encourage our children to ask big questions to find out about how and why the world, our country, culture and local community have developed over time. In doing so, we believe children gain the greatest understanding of how the past influences the present.

We are proud of the fact that history is the driver of many of our topics and underpins our whole-school ethos of providing a stimulating environment that creates an enthusiasm for learning.

History enables children to develop a context for their growing sense of identity and a chronological framework for their knowledge of significant events and people. What they learn through history can influence their decisions about personal choices, attitudes and values.

 

Year 1 vintage vehicle day

Comparing vehicles from the past with now.

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Year 2 re-enacting The Great Fiire of London

Responding to the question- How did the fire spread so quickly.

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curriculum map

 

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Reception

All about me – my history.

How have I changed over time?

Who is in my family?

Is everyone the same as me?


Children talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members. They know that other children don’t always enjoy the same things, and are sensitive to this. They know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions (DM – ELG K&U)

 

Dinosaurs – prehistoric history

Can I talk about things that have happened in the past?

 

 

They use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are to happen in the future. They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events. (DM- ELG S&L)

Year 1

 

On the move

Vintage vehicles and new vehicles – a comparison, looking at changes over time and their affect on us (safety). Artefacts.

 

First aeroplane flight (Wright brothers) the impact on travel, how life changed.

1. changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal

aspects of change in national life

2. events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally.

3. the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements.

Commotion in the Ocean

Christopher Columbus, learning about the famous explorer and the impact it had on world trade.

 

(small world table intro artefact table – maybe add David Attenborough and Greta Thurnberg).
 


3. the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods (Christopher Columbus)

Year 2

Castles & The British Monarchy

Timelines of British monarchs to build a sense of chronology.

A comparison of Queen Victoria & Elizabeth I and developing an understanding of their impact to British life.

History of castles (William the Conqueror) looking in particular at south coast castles to enable local history study.

Trip to Arundel castle looking at artefacts.

3. the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods (Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria)
2. events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally.

4 significant historical events, people and places in their own locality – is missing from history provision.

Great Fire of London
Own timelines – looking at changes within our personal history and beyond – with key events. Second-hand artefacts – Samuel Pepys’ & John Evelyn’s diaries.

Looking at cause and affect, how and why the fire started and the changes that happened post fire.

1. changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal

aspects of change in national life

2. events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally.

 



 

Year 3

Ancient Mayans

 

Traditional Mayan folk tales.

A contrast to British history


9. a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Romans (and Celts)

Fishbourne Roman Palace school trip –  artefacts.

Volcano at Pompeii (impact of Romans on Britain).

2. the Roman Empire and its impact on Britain
3. Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots (Roman withdrawal from Britain in c. AD 410 and the fall of the western Roman Empire)


 

 

 

 

Year 4

Tudors (1485 – 1603)

Power & monarchs
Artefacts – school trip W&D Museum

 King Henry VII&VIII particularly.

Battle of Britain re-enactment (shift of power)

Tudor Banquet (making pomanders, quill writing) portrait – link to Art. Tudor life to now.

6. a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066
 

 

 


 

 

A local history

Visits to Shoreham – Artefacts – changes over time.

Smugglers and smuggling in Shoreham (Sussex) local history

Victorians – Theme day – Victorian school day – artefacts
 


5. a local history study
6. a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

Year 5

4 ages of man

Stone age, bronze age, iron age, steel age (Vikings)

 

COULD INCLUDE

  • Late Neolithic hunter-gatherers and early farmers, for example, Skara Brae
  • Bronze Age religion, technology and travel, for example, Stonehenge
  • Iron Age hill forts: tribal kingdoms, farming, art and culture

Vikings – history of place names – longboats – Isle of Man hoard – Viking raids – Re-enactment of battles/raids – Lindisfarne – Shields (take home tasks)
 

1. Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

4. the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor

Ancient Egypt – sources of artefacts (photos) – investigation - trip to Brighton museum – real artefacts – dig for artefacts – history of death masks – Discovery by Howard Carter – mummification – food/music.

7. The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: Ancient Egypt

 

Year 6

World War II

 Allies & Axis. Propaganda posters. Evacuation. Kindertransport. Significance of the poppy. Battle of Britain. Rationing (more DT focus) Sam Beaver King & Windrush. War’s end –impact on today.
Artefacts.

Shoreham before/during/after the war

6. a study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

5. a local history study
 

 

Ancient Greece.

What was life like for the Greeks.

How their achievements impacted the western world.
Potential for artefacts?

8. Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the

western world

 

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